Tag Archives: Otago Peninsula Community Board

Reflecting on the Year

The Norwegian playwright and poet Henrik Ibsen once wrote that “a community is like a ship; everyone ought to be prepared to take the helm.” In many respects it was that wish to make a difference and be part of the decision-making process that led me to stand for the Otago Peninsula Community Board. Being prepared “to take the helm” as Ibsen wrote and represent my community in the daily ebbs of flows of community life. As 2014 draws to close its a good time for me to reflect on what the year has brought for me and the community while I have been serving on the Board. Probably most importantly I’ve been pleasantly surprised at the diversity of views that I’ve heard from people in the community. Those views all have one distinct common theme and that is a real concern for the type and nature of the community that people live in on the Peninsula. Some are steeped in the needs of the landscape and conservation management while others are heavily drawn to the facilities, opportunities and needs of the people who create the Peninsula community. All are argued with the same level of passion. I’ve enjoyed my first year on the Community Board mostly because of the people I’ve met and that through that contact I’m able in some small way make a difference to the wider social and political fabric that covers the community. Whether it be bus routes, the Portobello Pontoon or the Tomahawk Lagoon each issue has importance for the community that must deal with these issues on a day-to-day basis. For me it’s not a chore, rather its a challenge that asks me to exercise all of my skill in mediation, listening, planning and problem-solving. Sometimes it’s also about using simple common-sense which I’ve found that Peninsula residents have in droves. Its been an interesting and stimulating year and I’m looking forward to 2015 with similar enthusiasm.

Reflecting on 2014

Going for a Skate

Going for a skate!I was at the working bee held at the Portobello Domain, developing the skate park with a great bunch of people and their kids recently. Peninsula communities are so good at getting together and pitching in when there is something that needs to be done, especially when it comes to providing facilities for their kids. It was very pleasing to see so many of the local children take an interest and actively participate in helping the park get up and running. While my days of skate-boarding or scootering are well past there will always be a new generation of kids ready to give riding on wheels a try. Read the full story and view the pictures at the Portobello Community website.

The Consultative Corkscrew

Snooze it or lose it

The American Unionist Cesar Chavez once said “Our ambitions must be broad enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sake and for our own.” With the Dunedin City Council undertaking its Draft Significance and Engagement Policy we might well consider just how we decide and disseminate our individual and collective aspirations. For any community that means having the ability to voice both its opinions and values in the local government environment so that they are heard and understood. Deciding what is a big or small issue is fraught with questions and problems. Competing interests within the community may have a wide range of views that are equally valid, but they may not necessarily align into a consensus. What is significant to you may not be important to someone else. Which is why being able to present your views is an important part of ensuring that community aspirations can be achieved or developed to meet its needs. The City Council’s draft strategy is an important process for Dunedin residents and one that everyone should look closely at. All residents should feel that  such a policy will assist them in being heard, listened too and ultimately that decisions over issues large or small are transparent and fair. Feedback on this policy closes on Monday 10th November, so “don’t snooze and lose.”

The Passionfruit on the Peninsula

Passion-fruit

The Banana passion-fruit vine (Passiflora mollissima) has become a problem plant for the Otago Peninsula over recent years and has continued to occupy significant areas of roadside in Portobello and Harington Point Roads. Given its highly invasive nature and need for high light levels passion-fruit has begun to choke the life out of many  areas around the Peninsula. Its prolific fruit production has also been shown to be a suitable source of food for possums and birds distributing viable seed from the gut that can germinate. The other issue is if this plant remains widespread on roadside areas it will eventually be problematic to  conservation groups and agencies as well as private landowners who manage bush remnants on the Peninsula.

I have raised the issue of passion-fruit at our Community Board meetings and through The Star to highlight the need to look at a multi-agency approach to management of passion-fruit. That includes both the Dunedin City Council and Otago Regional Council. As a land manager one of the issues for the City Council is understanding the extent of the problem and how to tackle it on the roadside areas. With in mind Moira Parker and myself have completed a map of the roadside areas on the Peninsula using GPS waypoints. The extent of the spread of passion-fruit surprised me with 220 sites identified and mapped. This mapping exercise now gives the City Council some hard data to develop a programme of suitable control, but it won’t be easy. This has to be looked at as a long-term and constant project over the course of 6-7 years and discussions with the Council will be ongoing. In the mean time one of the most simplest things people on the Peninsula can do is eat more passion-fruit! By harvesting the fruit it reduces the opportunity for further seed dispersal. If you are eating the fruit or preparing it just remember to dispose of seed and vine material in your refuse, not your compost!

The map below shows the 220 sites identified predominantly on roadside areas. You can navigate around it within the frame by using your mouse. Click on one of the markers and you’ll see a photograph of the site. You can also view the map in a full screen view by clicking on the box icon on the top right corner.

 

Accepting the Challenge

Pope Whanau

On a rather gloomy damp day that was thick with mist staying in bed seemed like a very good option, but the Pope whanau from Portobello had other ideas. My wife Lyn and I have always encouraged our kids to be good citizens and do things for their community selflessly. We want them to take an interest in their community and care for their region like we do. Keep New Zealand Beautiful Week is always an opportunity to do something positive for your community and its a family tradition in our house to get involved in our area. 2014 was especially important because the challenge went out to all of the Community Boards across Dunedin and as a Peninsula Community Board member I’m very happy to accept. Our family covered the 6 kilometre road section from Portobello township to the Golf Course on Harington Point Road. It was amazing what we picked up and our haul included; 6 bags of general rubbish, a sackful of glass bottles, a sackful of aluminium cans, two car tyres, two dumped microwaves and various car parts. I’d also like to mention Portobello local Melissa Bulger who collected rubbish over part of this area while she was training for the Cadbury Half Marathon, great effort! I know also that many other residents around the Peninsula will take part in the Keep New Zealand Beautiful initiative, so my thanks to them also. I’m really proud of my kids for their efforts today and I know that with Lyn and I providing an example for them we can create great future citizens for our community.

Keeping the Country Beautiful

We all have the chance to do our bit for the state of our community. Get in behind Keep NZ Beautiful.

KDB 2014

Home on the Range

Planting at Victory BeachOne of the great things about living on the Otago Peninsula and having children at a local school is you get to do some of the cool things that they do as well. I was one of two parents who took a group of children from Portobello School to Okia Reserve for “World Ranger Day” with the Yellow-eyed Penguin Trust. Getting children out of the classroom and providing a genuine ranger experience was a great concept, but having pupils from the three Peninsula schools was pure genius. Like it or not there is a need for conservation groups to be prepared to pass on the mantle of stewardship onto a younger generation, and the earlier we do this the better. Peninsula kids are very fortunate that they grow up in a landscape inhabited by iconic wildlife species. We can only hope that this experience and their own inquiry will develop either empathetic citizens or active conservationists.

What I really enjoyed about the ranger day was the hands on activities that provided a genuine wildlife management experience. From exercises in measuring and identifying birds, to pest control and habitat creation, each activity was designed to show what really needs to be done in wildlife conservation. So much of what actually goes on in the field is unknown to the public, and to be able to provide that experience for our school children was a great experience. I’m sure many of the pupils will share their experience with their parents and family.

After events like this there’s always time to pause and reflect on some of the things that you take away from them. One of the big issues that stands out for me is how much the Peninsula relies on voluntary organisations and citizen conservationists to protect and advocate for our wildlife and landscape. The voluntary hours, fundraising and hard work put into places like Okia is quite staggering, and that is both comforting and concerning at the same time. It also highlights my view that the Peninsula Community Board has an important role to act as advocates and supporters for conservation groups in our district. That means using policy, planning and financial forums to ensure this critical work can continue on the Peninsula. After my experience at Okia it’s not difficult to understand just how important that role is and how rewarding it can be for our children today and in the future.