Tag Archives: Otago Peninsula

Having Skin In the Game

The debate between the Otago Peninsula community and the Otago Regional Council over the provision of bus services for school commuters has been a long and arduous one. Recently, local parent Jason Graham and I presented a petition of nearly 1000 signatures seeking three very simple things;

  • A timetable change
  • An additional bus to create a half hourly service like the rest of the city
  • A minor route change that caters for all users.

Over the course of the bus argument the way in which the community has presented well researched, reasoned and pragmatic solutions has been difficult for the Regional Council to answer. Combine that with a sympathetic media and the campaign has been very effective. However, what has also been effective is the way the community removed the emotion from the debate. That has allowed a far more compelling and coherent argument to be presented. Whether that will be successful is now up for debate. The community has been united over this issue and has shown considerable resolve. I can only hope that it’s not in vain.

Advertisements

The Freedom Factor

Freedom CampingIn the last few months we’ve seen the knotty problem of freedom camping in areas like Warrington raised by the community. Having spent the last three years on the Otago Peninsula Community Board dealing with this issue its become clear that we must act far more decisively than we have done to date. That means investment, dialogue and looking at innovative ways to control the effects of the activity on local people and local areas.

In the Peninsula example the Dunedin City Council undertook a trial of using the main street of Macandrew Bay. The result was an influx of campers in non self-contained vehicles stretching local resources to the limit. With it came significant unrest among the community and others that supported the trial. After consulting with the community the Board sought a change in the bylaw and a removal of the trial area from Macandrew Bay and this changed the problem dramatically. The bylaw also removed non self-contained vehicles off public areas onto designated areas or private motor camps. Unfortunately, in the Warrington example that change has brought about even greater pressure on the site as it becomes more popular for visitors. In my view, its time we moved away from ad hoc schemes and took a more planned approach to the issue city wide. A more comprehensive approach to the issue should:

  • Undertake proper research into visitor accommodation and expenditure through the University of Otago Tourism Department to have real data for decision-making and planning.
  • Invest in appropriate infrastructure so that we no longer have to “make do.”
  • Develop in partnership with the Department of Conservation or private enterprise for DoC style campsites with water, toilets and rubbish collection that can be used by campers for a nightly fee.
  • Have limits on the numbers at certain sites to reduce the stress on communities.
  • Close sites during the off-season to give the community a break from visitors.
  • Create jobs or contracts for the management of sites within the community for local people. No one is a better ambassador than a local person.
  • Resource enforcement, signage, and information properly so that everyone understands the rules.
  • Ensure non self-contained campers are in a designated freedom camping area or private camping ground only.
  • Look more deeply at the availability of land suitable for the activity. 

I don’t have a golden bullet or a magic wand to solve the problem, but we must take a far more pragmatic approach to the issue.

 

Wind Blown Dust and Dirt

Highcliff TreeThe recent gale force winds that ripped through the city last week were a bleak reminder of just how vulnerable we all are in the face of natural storm events. With damage to infrastructure, power outages and road closures our ability to be resilient in the face of such events was sorely tested. On the Otago Peninsula the storm saw Portobello Road lashed with surging seas that caused flooding and minor slipping. The miracle was that the road was kept opened and some credit must be given to the very busy contract crews for their work.

Highcliff SlipHowever, the closure of the alternative Highcliff Rd route is of major concern as we approach winter. The isolation of the Peninsula and its vulnerability to road closures have been well recorded in recent years. By good fortune the alternative routes at Castlewood and Highcliff Roads have been well used during post storm clean ups of slips on Portobello Road. Since the June 2015 floods the Highcliff Road route has been closed and it has caused significant problems and anxiety for the community. The City Council has announced (ODT 14th March) that the Highcliff slip will be tendered shortly. While its easy to criticize Council for the length of time its taken to get to this point, last weeks gales are a poignant reminder of just how urgent this work is for the community. Let’s hope its done very soon.

Sand Mining at Tomahawk

Tomahawk

The Tomahawk Community have expressed long-term concerns over the removal of sand from the beach. In 2015 I met with the Otago Regional Council to discuss those issues and to ask them to provide more information on the issue. One of the things they have agreed is to make their monitoring reports available to me at the Board and the community. For the benefit of the community I have provided the relevant documents here for people to view and disseminate. I’m not going to comment publicly on the issue, but would be interested to hear from the community further on the issue. One further thing, is that in order for the contractor to enter the beach they must cross a section of reserve, hence the City Council must issue a lease document.

Tomahawk Sand Mining Lease and Consent

 ORC Consent Audit and Complaints Summary Tomahawk Nov 15

 

Review of the Year

Its been a busy year for myself and the Peninsula Community Board with a variety of issues and projects. I never find being on the Board a chore because there’s always something interesting to be done or a new people to meet. I’ve always been a problem-solver so being on the Board is actually an enjoyable challenge. I’m looking forward to 2016 because I feel I have more to offer and do for the community. Some of those issues include;

  • The 2GP and how the final issues around hazard management and rural are resolved for regions like the Peninsula.
  • Tomahawk School and the ongoing need to ensure the community have a say in the way these Council assets are managed.
  • Tomahawk Lagoon and the way the ORC manage the water quality and levels for the welfare of the community.
  • Roading projects around the Peninsula including the re-opening of Highcliff Road.
  • Sand dune management in places like Tomahawk and Okia.
  • Supporting the Te Rauone community to complete their beach management project.
  • Reviewing how effective the new freedom camping bylaw has been.
  • Continuing to advocate for better broadband and rural internet access.

2015

Making Plans and Planning

The District Plan is an extremely important document for Dunedin. It outlines the future direction of the city in regards to development, business, housing and the environment. The Resource Management Act 1991 requires a district plan to have;

  • Objectives for the district
  • Policies to implement the objectives
  • Rules to implement the policies.

It’s a crucial document to the city, but it’s also one that people need to take notice of and understand how its rules, policies and objectives might affect them. It may change what you can do on your property or the activities that you can undertake. With this in mind its imperative that everyone takes notice of the district plan and participates in the submission process. if there is something that you don’t like about the plan and you don’t submit on that issue, that section could become operative and its much harder to change.

I urge everyone to look at the proposed 2GP and at the least look at the maps to ascertain any changes to your property or community. The community only has until Tuesday, November 24 2015 to finalise their submissions.

You can view the plan and look at your submission options here.

2GP

Some Roading History

Roading issues occupy a significant part of your time when living on the Otago Peninsula. The slip at Turnbull’s Bay has been a long period of inconvenience that the community have been very patient with as the repairs near their end. This photograph from the Peninsula Museum illustrates just how much has changed over 100 years since it was taken.

Broad Bay

11257879_1601303366811963_1023425627343108673_o