Tag Archives: Paul Pope Election Candidate

Dunedin-the Affordable City?

One of the main themes of the Dunedin City Council Economic Development Strategy has been the notion that Dunedin is an affordable city. That’s an admirable idea and one that every person would naturally support. However, when looking at the annual fees and charges that the City Council ask citizens pay for services it becomes clear that our affordability is rapidly being eroded away. These types of costs hurt our community and our economy.

What’s new you might ask? Well when you compare the increases in City Council fees and charges over the last 3-5 years they’re generally higher than the current rate of inflation. Remember that inflation is a sustained increase in the general level of prices for goods and services. It is measured as an annual percentage increase. As inflation rises, every dollar you own buys a smaller percentage of a good or service. It means that you see a decline of the purchasing power of you money. This is particularly relevant to people on medium to low incomes who through that loss of purchasing power see a decline in their standard of living.

Several areas of the Council’s fees and charges are very concerning given that the New Zealand economy has been in a period of low inflation for several years and has dropped to 0.4% this year. Some examples of increases in fees and charges being considerably greater than the rate of inflation are;

  • Burial and cremation fees have risen by 18% in the last 5 years
  • Charges to sports clubs for sports fields have risen 13.4% in 5 years, 7.5% in the last 3 years.
  • A 3.25% increase in dog registration fees every year in the last 5 years.
  • The permit for building a deck in your  house has risen 27.5% in 4 years.

Some increases may be attributable to changes in government policy and legislation but in the light of the annual 3% increase in rates heralded by the City Council each year it appears fees and charges are subsidising those capped increases. These increases in the everyday aspects of peoples lives in Dunedin is hurting our community in a wide variety of areas. Its time that we had a more transparent look at the just how affordable our city really is in lieu of these costs for everyday things in our community.

The NZ Rate of Inflation

The NZ Rate of Inflation

Ko to tatou hapori i te tuatahi

I was a little whakama (shy, nervous) about putting out an election sign in Te Reo Maori. However, living on the Peninsula and working in Dunedin has taught me to look deeply at the nature of our community and how we can support one another.Language is one of those ways, and through it we can learn a deeper understanding of the world and place we live in. I’ve been very fortunate to receive much support and guidance from many Maori people in my life, so I thought I would be brave. Nga mihi.

Copy of Te Reo Poster

The Freedom Factor

Freedom CampingIn the last few months we’ve seen the knotty problem of freedom camping in areas like Warrington raised by the community. Having spent the last three years on the Otago Peninsula Community Board dealing with this issue its become clear that we must act far more decisively than we have done to date. That means investment, dialogue and looking at innovative ways to control the effects of the activity on local people and local areas.

In the Peninsula example the Dunedin City Council undertook a trial of using the main street of Macandrew Bay. The result was an influx of campers in non self-contained vehicles stretching local resources to the limit. With it came significant unrest among the community and others that supported the trial. After consulting with the community the Board sought a change in the bylaw and a removal of the trial area from Macandrew Bay and this changed the problem dramatically. The bylaw also removed non self-contained vehicles off public areas onto designated areas or private motor camps. Unfortunately, in the Warrington example that change has brought about even greater pressure on the site as it becomes more popular for visitors. In my view, its time we moved away from ad hoc schemes and took a more planned approach to the issue city wide. A more comprehensive approach to the issue should:

  • Undertake proper research into visitor accommodation and expenditure through the University of Otago Tourism Department to have real data for decision-making and planning.
  • Invest in appropriate infrastructure so that we no longer have to “make do.”
  • Develop in partnership with the Department of Conservation or private enterprise for DoC style campsites with water, toilets and rubbish collection that can be used by campers for a nightly fee.
  • Have limits on the numbers at certain sites to reduce the stress on communities.
  • Close sites during the off-season to give the community a break from visitors.
  • Create jobs or contracts for the management of sites within the community for local people. No one is a better ambassador than a local person.
  • Resource enforcement, signage, and information properly so that everyone understands the rules.
  • Ensure non self-contained campers are in a designated freedom camping area or private camping ground only.
  • Look more deeply at the availability of land suitable for the activity. 

I don’t have a golden bullet or a magic wand to solve the problem, but we must take a far more pragmatic approach to the issue.

 

Reflecting on the Year

The Norwegian playwright and poet Henrik Ibsen once wrote that “a community is like a ship; everyone ought to be prepared to take the helm.” In many respects it was that wish to make a difference and be part of the decision-making process that led me to stand for the Otago Peninsula Community Board. Being prepared “to take the helm” as Ibsen wrote and represent my community in the daily ebbs of flows of community life. As 2014 draws to close its a good time for me to reflect on what the year has brought for me and the community while I have been serving on the Board. Probably most importantly I’ve been pleasantly surprised at the diversity of views that I’ve heard from people in the community. Those views all have one distinct common theme and that is a real concern for the type and nature of the community that people live in on the Peninsula. Some are steeped in the needs of the landscape and conservation management while others are heavily drawn to the facilities, opportunities and needs of the people who create the Peninsula community. All are argued with the same level of passion. I’ve enjoyed my first year on the Community Board mostly because of the people I’ve met and that through that contact I’m able in some small way make a difference to the wider social and political fabric that covers the community. Whether it be bus routes, the Portobello Pontoon or the Tomahawk Lagoon each issue has importance for the community that must deal with these issues on a day-to-day basis. For me it’s not a chore, rather its a challenge that asks me to exercise all of my skill in mediation, listening, planning and problem-solving. Sometimes it’s also about using simple common-sense which I’ve found that Peninsula residents have in droves. Its been an interesting and stimulating year and I’m looking forward to 2015 with similar enthusiasm.

Reflecting on 2014

Welcome to My Web Site

Kiaora Koutou, tena koutou katoa, nau mai haere mai.

SONY DSCGidday and welcome to my personal site that discusses my life an issues on the Otago Peninsula Community Board Election website. I’ve created this site to allow people the opportunity to learn more about me and more about what I have to offer the Otago Peninsula. Please take the time to look at the Issues and Information page. Remember these are my personal views and not the views of the Otago Peninsula Community Board.

  • I look forward to hearing from people on the Peninsula who would like to know more about me and how I would best represent them on the Otago Peninsula Community Board.

Sandfly Panorama

Authorised by Paul Pope, 2 Sherwood Street Portobello, Dunedin